Review

Current Directions in Medical Student Well-Being

Published Mar 6, 2017

Abstract Traditionally, topics pertaining to student well-being have been conspicuously sparse throughout medical school curricula. This contradiction has been well documented in human health literature, and the academic medical community has developed strategies to respond to this need. A literature review of terms pertaining to medical student wellness was conducted to generate 34 unique articles…. Read more

Maternal Syphilis: Variations in Prenatal Screening, Treatment, and Diagnosis of Congenital Syphilis

Published Mar 6, 2017

Abstract Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that, if left untreated, can impact fetal development. In this systematic review of syphilis in pregnancy, we attempt to better understand worldwide discrepancies regarding its diagnosis and management. OVID MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched for keywords and 74 relevant articles were identified. Twenty-nine articles were ultimately included… Read more

Room for improvement in the New York State pharmacy-based syringe access program

Published May 25, 2015

Abstract Pharmacies in New York State can opt-in to a pharmacy based syringe access program called the Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP). Washington Heights CORNER Project, a syringe exchange program in New York City, undertook a two-part survey of pharmacies located less than two miles from the program in Northern Manhattan. The study sought to… Read more

Is participation in a clinical trial associated with a survival benefit in patients with bladder cancer?

Published May 25, 2015

Abstract Bladder cancer that is unresponsive to intravesical therapies is difficult to treat. Patients with this disease usually have to try salvage therapies, partial cystectomy, or radical cystectomy. Unfortunately, the population afflicted by bladder cancer is older and frailer than those afflicted by other cancers with mortality approaching 1.5% and readmission rates approaching 64%. These… Read more

Should there be specialty courts for medical malpractice litigation?

Published May 25, 2015

Abstract Medical malpractice suits consume time, money and energy. They strike fears of nightmarishly lengthy, complex litigation in the minds of health care providers. Ill or injured patients filing such suits feel wronged, unsure of what really happened and desperately seek justice and compensation. The current tort system with jury trials, in place in America… Read more